Home Uncategorized The best images from our trip to Iceland in September

The best images from our trip to Iceland in September

by Roberto
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2020 has become a year of reflection on past travels rather than looking forward to those to come. With the changing of the months its an ideal time to stare nostalgically at my travels in Iceland in September.

While reading a post from fellow adventurer Linda at Retired and Travelling on waterfalls and volcanoes in Iceland I was inspired to look into my own travels there. Despite suffering many setbacks on our trip to Iceland (a story that will be told on this blog soon), the sheer beauty of Iceland broke through in my photos. So much so I was inspired to share. It’s been a while since I dedicated a blog just to photos. If ever a place is deserving Iceland is it.

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Reykjavik

Reykjavik is most people’s first port of call on arriving in Iceland, and a good introduction to the country, and its friendly people. But it’s not like other capital cities, there are no skyscrapers, and no bustling shopping streets. With a tiny population of 120,000 this city is defined in other ways. Cute wooden houses and stores fill its centre. The 73 metres high tower of the Hallgrimskirkja church dominates the skyline. Taking the appearance of an upside down church its the memorable feature of this capital.

Reykjavik’s waterfront is distinguishable by the the Harpa concert building, and the stainless steel sculpture of the sun voyager boat. It’s through art that much of the city’s best features are seen; the street art scene is vibrant and echoes the voices of its townsfolk in its messages. September sees the city spring to life with the annual Reykjavik international film festival, which focuses on young up and coming talents.

Grassy roofs are a common sight around the island. This one is in the city, but more are dotted around the country including the Arbaer open air museum
Hallgrimskirkja
The imposing Hallgrimskirkja Iceland’s imposing cathedral from 1986
Hallgrimskirkja view
The view across Reykjavik from Hallgrimskirkja. The port at the rear is the perfect place to take whale watching tours
Reykjavik street art
Reykjavik street art
A few examples of the street art that Reykjavik has become known for
Sun voyager
The sun voyager sculpture by Jon Gunnar Arnason

While Reykjavik has its charms, Iceland is most certainly better known for those that lay beyond the city limits. It’s backdrop gives more than an inviting hint to the rugged landscape that lies beyond.

Iceland In september
the highlands to the north of Reykjavik

Iceland in September

There are two huge principal reasons that people book Icelandic trip for, the chance to see aurora borealis and to soak in its geothermal features such as the Blue Lagoon. We hoped by booking in September we would have the relatively warm weather of summer and the prospect of taking a northern lights tour. Turns out we were wrong and got neither. Iceland appears to have harsh September weather, defined by cold temperatures and incessant rain. Not the best conditions for seeing natures greatest show.

But the Blue Lagoon at least doesn’t care what month of the year you travel.
Its swimming pools are an ever reliable blue, and is one of those things that must be seen.

Blue lagoon
Blue Lagoon

Golden Circle

In my opinion Iceland is all about hitting the road. Route one, Iceland’s ring road circumnavigates the country, giving access to the sights of the south coast, and to the distant Akureyki and Myvatn in the north, and the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in the east also. There is certainly no greater way to see this unusual country. Driving conditions were perfect in September, and with this being the land of the midnight sun, the days were therefore perfectly long to cram them full. All good itineraries start with the Golden Circle, so that’s exactly what we did.

The typical drive begins firstly with a visit to Thingviller national park, where the division between 2 tectonic plates is seen. Oxarafoss waterfall is not to be missed after all that rain. One of the greatest things about Iceland travel then follows, the geyser park. After a few dormant geysers, Strokkur then brings the excitement every eight minutes. A majestic sight.

But the Golden Circle has one more powerhouse attraction. Gulfoss might not be Iceland’s biggest waterfall but it looks it. With those rainbows it could be from the realm of fantasy.

Iceland in september
The separation of the plates
Iceland in september
Oxararfoss
Iceland in september
Views across the land from Thinviller
Iceland in september
Random little waterfall
Strokkur geyser
Strokkur erupting
Iceland in september
Litli geyser
Iceland in september
Blesi geyser
Gulfoss
Gulfoss waterfall
Iceland in september
I searched -no leprechauns. Perhaps the elves drove them away
Gulfoss
Another view of Gulfoss

Waterfalls of Iceland in September

One of the greatest pursuits when visiting Iceland is chasing waterfalls. Its no understatement to say they are everywhere. But the attraction is those huge ones that dot the landscape. We began our waterfall tour of the south coast with Seljalandsfoss, the only one I know of where you have the pleasure of walking inside. The unmissable Skogafoss is nearby, and worth the hike over to see the the waterfalls above.

Seljalandsfoss Iceland
Seljalandsfoss
Seljalandsfoss Iceland
Walking behind the raging waters
Skogafoss Iceland
Skogafoss
Skogafoss Iceland
Beautiful from all angles
Iceland in september
The falls above Skogafoss
Iceland in september
Sheep are a common sight, and don’t seem as in awe of waterfalls as I was

Features of the South Coast of Iceland

The south coast has a diverse selection of attractions from its sparsely dotted towns to those that lie in nature. Churches are one of the things about Iceland that will really catch your eye.

Iceland in september

Known as Dranguinn i Drandshlio these shelters are built into a huge mound of rock. It appears that the rock grew around them, but as far as I know rock doesn’t grow.

Iceland in september
Iceland in september
Which came first the house, or the rock?

The Solheimajokull glacier is one of the most easily reached in the country, as the road essentially drives up to it. Despite the cold and the starkness it was a thing of beauty.

Iceland in september
Winter is coming!!!
Iceland in september
Some slides I wouldn’t like to see the bottom of
Solheimajokull glacier
The cleanest piece of ice there

Geothermal areas

Iceland’s geothermal areas are amongst its most fun. Where else can you possibly channel your inner dragon. The areas at Reykjadalur and Krysuvik were most unusual, as a result of their strange colours, bubbling mud, and the smoking landscape.

Iceland in september
Iceland in september
Iceland in september
Iceland in september
Iceland in september

Vik

The town of Vik is a perfect resting point in South Iceland, and has more going for it than just a warm bed. The black sand beach at Reynisfjara is another volcanic wonder. With sea stacks, arches and basalt columns its particularly awesome to explore. Not the best for sunbathing though.

Iceland in september
Basalt columns
Reynisfjara beach
The view of the black sand from the Dyrholaey Arch

Landscapes of Iceland in September

Of course the landscapes of Iceland need their own credit. One word was in my mind through all my trip, raw. It’s definitely how I’ll undoubtedly always remember this untamed and wild country.

Iceland in september
Eyjafjallajokull towering above the road. It held the record as the biggest disrupter of travel known, that is until this year came along
Iceland in september
I think I would always live in fear of rockfalls if I lived there
Iceland in september
Iceland in september
Iceland in september
Please refer to my earlier comment on rockfalls
Iceland in september
Rainbow mountain or rainbow on mountain?

Icelandic Horses

Allow me to tame it all with some of Iceland’s most loved residents. Icelandic horses are a unique breed, kept pure as a result of a ban from travelling. Those that leave are never allowed to return. A radical way indeed to keep the breed safe.

Icelandic horse
celandic horse
Awwwwwww

If you enjoyed my photography then you may appreciate some of my other photo blogs:

50 photo of Colmar

50 photos of Bruges

2019: a year in photos.

What was your favourite part of Iceland? Let me know in the comments below.

Iceland in September
Iceland in September

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